<\body> Stories in America: A Day in the Life of Women Around the Globe

Monday, April 03, 2006

A Day in the Life of Women Around the Globe

As killings increase, Baghdad residents have increasingly taken up firearms. Elham Bayroti was given a pistol as a government employee, but has taken it with her outside of work. (Photo: Max Becherer / Polaris)


A woman weeps for her relative who was shot to death along with four others in their family home Sunday night by gunmen, Monday April 3, 2006 in Baghdad, Iraq. Family mourned for victims of gunmen who charged into a Shiite home late Sunday, lined up a brother, two sisters, and an uncle against a wall and shot them dead, as U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw urged Iraqi leaders to form a government as soon as possible to curb the bloodshed and rein in sectarian militias behind much of the country's violence. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)


Iraqi women weep as they look at the coffin carrying their relative who was part of a family which was shot to death by gunmen Sunday night in Baghdad, Iraq Monday April 3, 2006. (AP Photo/Hadi Mizban)


Palestinian women shout slogans as they hold pictures of their jailed sons during a demonstration, calling for the release of Palestinian prisoners from Israeli jails, in the West Bank city of Nablus April 3, 2006. (REUTERS/Abed Omar Qusini)


Indian women stand in line at a polling station in Sonapur village, about 40km (25 miles) from Guwahati, the capital of India's northeastern state of Assam April 3, 2006. Thousands of people lined up on Monday to vote in India's Assam state as troops protected polling booths from possible rebel attacks at the start of the biggest electorial test for the federal coalition. (REUTERS/Utpal Baruah)


A Ukrainian woman burns grass at a farm just outside the 30-km exclusion zone around the closed Chernobyl nuclear power plant April 2, 2006. Ukraine is preparing to mark the 20th anniversary of the world's worst nuclear disaster, when the fourth reactor at the Chernobyl plant exploded, spreading radioactivity across Europe and the Soviet Union. Picture taken April 2, 2006. (REUTERS/Damir Sagolj)


Cambodian women plant rice seedlings in a paddy field south of Phnom Penh. More than 1,000 Cambodians digging up ancient rice paddies in the country's east in search for gold and other artifacts have been told to stop it and go home, officials said. (AFP/File/Rob Elliott)

10 Comments:

At 4/03/2006 10:38 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

More good news coming out of Iraq.

Did you see Condoleeza waving to shoppers in England while the protestors were screaming in her face? pathetic.

 
At 4/03/2006 11:57 AM, Anonymous truthseeker said...

Yeah, and she said the administration has made "thousands of errors"

Where is that headline?

 
At 4/03/2006 12:00 PM, Anonymous truthseeker said...

http://www.truthout.org/docs_2006/040206B.shtml
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice faced more protests and public embarrassment here on Saturday that have turned a trip meant to be a friendly follow-up to an American trip by Foreign Secretary Jack Straw into a two-day run through a raucous, mishap-ridden gantlet.

She was heckled by protesters and faced criticism from Muslim leaders hand-selected to meet with her by the Foreign Office during a visit here, the hometown of Mr. Straw. He visited Ms. Rice's hometown, Birmingham, Ala., in October.

About 250 protesters ringing Blackburn's City Hall shouted "Shame on you" as the two arrived. Through the din, Ms. Rice looked off into the distance and spotted a handful of people, many holding shopping bags, who had stopped to gawk.

She pointed them out to Mr. Straw, and the two of them waved enthusiastically. Later, Mr. Straw said this gathering of "people who agree with the visit" was "at least as large as the protesters."

 
At 4/03/2006 4:41 PM, Anonymous timmy said...

Near London, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, on a visit with British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw was greeted with jeers, chanting protestors and t-shirt slogans critical of the Bush administration’s Iraq policy.

During a speech Rice said she was not bothered by the people who passionately believe that it was wrong to overthrow the regime of Saddam Hussein.

“I welcome this expression of free speech,” she said.

Rice was so cordial, she invited all the protestors to join her after the speech for a nostalgic turn-back-the-clock party where they could enjoy the kind of hospitality that Saddam gave to protestors during his reign.

 
At 4/03/2006 5:27 PM, Anonymous war resister said...

Really? Rice welcomes free speech? Too bad she doesn't welcome it in her own country.

V.A. Nurse Accused of Sedition After Publishing Letter Critical of Bush on Katrina, Iraq
http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=06/03/02/148237&mode=thread&tid=25

 
At 4/03/2006 8:05 PM, Blogger kat said...

Rice was so cordial, she invited all the protestors to join her after the speech for a nostalgic turn-back-the-clock party where they could enjoy the kind of hospitality that Saddam gave to protestors during his reign.

Oh cool! Where did they have this party? Abu Ghraib?

 
At 4/03/2006 9:38 PM, Anonymous Bush Supports the Troops! said...

timmy, does someone pay you to apologize for bush?

 
At 4/03/2006 10:25 PM, Anonymous timmy said...

"Oh cool! Where did they have this party? Abu Ghraib?"

Good idea, Kat! Maybe we could invite this prisoner at the Abu Ghraib prison who was tortured by dripping nitric acid....

scroll down to the pic
http://mypetjawa.mu.nu/archives/092559.php


"timmy, does someone pay you to apologize for bush?"

Yes, Karl Rove -- code name: Kat.

 
At 4/04/2006 9:53 AM, Blogger kat said...

The very fact that the discussion even boils down to "who tortures more effectively at Abu Ghraib, us or them" is something that every American should be repulsed by. Timmy seems to thrive on it, though. Odd.

 
At 4/04/2006 6:12 PM, Anonymous timmy said...

I'm not thriving on anything. You're the one that brought it up after I referenced Iraq during Saddam's rule. How should I have known you only meant American torture?

Especially considering it was so much worse under Saddam...and if it's only the comparison between Saddam's Abu Garaib and the American Abu Garaib that repulses you after looking at those pics, then you are truly a very very special person.

 

Post a Comment

<< Home