<\body> Stories in America: Who Supports the Troops?

Friday, November 18, 2005

Who Supports the Troops?

Bush and Cheney are on the defensive, saying comments from decorated war veterans like Congressman John Murtha are "sending the wrong message to our troops." The troops are dodging bullets and bombs on a daily basis. Does Cheney really think a call to bring them home is hurting them?

I've written several articles about what it really means to support the troops and I'm continually amazed that those who are in favor of the war and sport "Support Our Troops" ribbons on their cars are letting the Bush administration get away with disprespecting the troops by not providing them with adequate healthcare.

Here are a few articles that deserve more attention:

U.S. Veterans Denied Health Care, Retired General Hoar Says - Bloomberg
The Bush administration is shortchanging U.S. military veterans in health care, providing insufficient psychological support and other aid to troops returning from Iraq, a former head of U.S. Central Command said.
President George W. Bush "has consistently refused to provide enough for veteran's health care," retired Marine General Joseph Hoar said in the Democratic response to the president's weekly radio address.
"Thousands of veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan will require mental health care services, yet the Bush administration has not taken action to deal with this emerging problem," said Hoar, the commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East and Southwest Asia under President George H.W. Bush, the current U.S. president's father, and Marines Corps Chief of Staff of Operations during the 1991 Gulf War.

Vets lash out at House over budget moves - The Hill
As Veterans Day approaches and the war in Iraq rages on, veterans-service organizations are criticizing House leaders for ending a 55-year legislative tradition, and fearing that Congress will not fill next year's budget gap for veterans healthcare.
Senators erupted in frustration earlier this year after Veterans Affairs (VA) Secretary Jim Nicholson conceded that the department was more than $1 billion short for 2005. They will get a chance to vent again today when Nicholson appears before the Veterans Affairs Committee at a hearing on VA hospitals damaged by Hurricane Katrina.
But lobbyists for veterans groups are most incensed at Rep. Steve Buyer (R-Ind.), the new House Veterans Affairs Committee chairman, who announced Tuesday that the groups would no longer have the opportunity to make legislative recommendations at joint House-Senate hearings.

12 Comments:

At 11/19/2005 10:35 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks for bringing attention to this issue. I know a few people who haven't received adequate healthcare. It's a disgrace. for any of you Bush fans reading, what's your response? I really want to know. Shouldn't we be making sacrifices for the troops, not passing tax cuts for the rich?

 
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Definite loss. The loss takes place at a known time, in a known place, and from a known cause. The classic example is death of an insured person on a life insurance policy. Fire, automobile accidents, and worker injuries may all easily meet this criterion. Other types of losses may only be definite in theory. Occupational disease, for instance, may involve prolonged exposure to injurious conditions where no specific time, place or cause is identifiable. Ideally, the time, place and cause of a loss should be clear enough that a reasonable person, with sufficient information, could objectively verify all three elements.
Accidental loss. The event that constitutes the trigger of a claim should be fortuitous, or at least outside the control of the beneficiary of the insurance. The loss should be pure, in the sense that it results from an event for which there is only the opportunity for cost. Events that contain speculative elements, such as ordinary business risks or even purchasing a lottery ticket, are generally not considered insurable.
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Accidental loss. The event that constitutes the trigger of a claim should be fortuitous, or at least outside the control of the beneficiary of the insurance. The loss should be pure, in the sense that it results from an event for which there is only the opportunity for cost. Events that contain speculative elements, such as ordinary business risks or even purchasing a lottery ticket, are generally not considered insurable.
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